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Concert Hall tours

Snape Maltings Concert Halls is one of the world's best-loved concert venues and one of the first industrial buildings to have been converted for arts use.

Built by Newson Garrett in the mid-19th century, the 832-seat Concert Hall began life as a malthouse. Officially opened in 1967 by HM Queen Elizabeth II, Snape Maltings Concert Hall became the main venue of the Aldeburgh Festival. It suffered serious damage in a fire in 1969 but was re-opened in time for the following year's Aldeburgh Festival in 1970.
 

Concert Hall viewings

At specified times we open the Concert Hall for viewings, which are free of charge and accompanied by a guide. A list of upcoming viewing times is below. There is no need to book.

Upcoming opening times in 2014:

Sunday 21 September: 11am - 1pm, 2pm - 4pm
Monday 22 September: 11am - 1pm, 2pm - 4.30pm
Thursday 25 September: 11am - 1pm, 2pm - 5pm
Friday 26 September: 11am - 1pm
Monday 29 September: 2pm - 4.30pm
Tuesday 30 September: 11am - 1pm, 2pm - 4.30pm
 

Backstage Tours in August

During our annual Snape Proms in August we offer extensive 45-minute guided tours of the Concert Hall each Wednesday at 12 noon.
 

Group Tours

Backstage tours of Snape Maltings Concert Hall and the new Hoffmann Building, looking at the history of the Maltings from malthouse to concert hall, can be arranged for groups between 12 and 40, subject to the Hall’s availability.

For more information please call 01728 687100 or email enquiries@aldeburgh.co.uk.


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Snape Maltings Concert Hall. Photo: Nigel Luckhurst

Snape and Aldeburgh

‘Snape Maltings is one of those rare artistic places where the buildings, the people who visit and work there, the magical setting, come together and enable you to do something out of the ordinary.’ – Alfred Brendel

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'A unique selling point about Aldeburgh is that it is a wonderful place to be, no matter if the weather is fair or foul. If the sun is shining, the wide sea vista gleams with a brilliance few places can rival. If the east coast does its worst, the scudding black clouds and biting winds conjure a Peter Grimes atmosphere that is what this town, forever associated with Benjamin Britten, is all about.'
– Richard Fairman, Financial Times, June 2008

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